Thursday, January 7, 2016

New "Dietary Guidelines" Recommends Eating Less Sugar & Meat


New "Dietary Guidelines" Recommends Eating Less Sugar & Meat



CSPI Praises Specific Recommended Limits on Added Sugars and Saturated Fat at 10 Percent of Calories Each
January 7, 2016
Americans should be eating more fruits and vegetables and less added sugars, saturated fat, and sodium, according to the federal government’s new Dietary Guidelines for Americans. The once-every-five-years publication, written jointly by the U.S. Department of Agriculture and the Department of Health and Human Services with the advice of an expert panel of scientists, provides the government’s basic nutrition advice and forms the basis for much federal, state, and local food policy.
Notably, the 2015 Guidelines released today recommends consuming less than 10 percent of calories each from added sugars and saturated fat. The evidence is strong, the Guidelines states, that diets with less meat are associated with reduced risk of heart disease and stroke. Moderate evidence indicates that those eating patterns are associated with a reduced risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and some types of cancer, according to the publication. Teen boys and adult men also “need to reduce overall intake of protein foods by decreasing intakes of meats, poultry, and eggs and increasing amounts of vegetables or other underconsumed food groups,” according to the Guidelines.
............................
“Of course while the government publishes this earnest and well-intentioned advice, the soft-drink, restaurant, snack-food, meat, and cheese industries will continue to spend billions of dollars promoting foods and beverages that directly contradict that advice,” Jacobson said. “Those sophisticated marketing campaigns make it harder for Americans to eat diets that will protect against obesity, diabetes, heart disease, cancer, and other serious diet-related problems.” 
The full story is available at the Center for Science in the Public Interest website. 

No comments:

Post a Comment